Opponent of Straight Lines - Friedensreich Hundertwasser

by KamilaSu 20. October 2014 16:02

 

Sharp edges, right angles, parallel walls, levelled windows, uniform sizes, all this and many other conventional rules of architecture and interior design were opposed by Friedensreich Hundertwasser who demonstrated that on his own designs of flats, houses and other buildings.

Hundertwasser House

Hundertwasser House in Vienna. He didn’t demand remuneration for the building project, because he was rather willing to invest in it than to allow another ugly building to be built in the city centre.

Friedrich Stowasser, better known as Hundertwasser was an Austrian artist, architect and one of the most influential figures of the beginnings of modern art and modern architecture. The name Friedensreich Regentag Dunkelbunt Hundertwasser, which he later adopted, perfectly epitomizes his philosophy of life and art. It means "One hundred coloured waters on a rainy day" and corresponds with his personal motto: "When one thinks he has to repair nature; he is always irreparably mistaken."

Hundertwasser was a versatile artist. He painted, illustrated books, designed facades, postage stamps, national flags or clothing, yet he is most famous for his architectural design, typical for its irregularity and effort to blend in with the surrounding landscape. He promoted and also set in practice the idea that every building should have afforested rooftops accessible to its tenants. Flat floors which are incompatible with the rules of nature should be replaced with uneven and irregular floors. And just as important for him as everything was the so-called window law: "The tenant shall have the right to lean out of the window, and paint the plaster as far as he can reach according to his creative soul."

 

Although he is often compared to Antonio Gaudi, Hundertwasser´s style is so distinctive and unique that his works are unmistakable. Look at a few buildings designed by him:

BadBlumau in Austria

BadBlumau in Austria. Buildings in a spa town imitate surrounding hills and what more compost toilets secure fertilisers for local agriculture. 

Maishima incineration plant in Osaka, Japan

Maishima incineration plant in Osaka, Japan. Hundertwasser was willing to design industrial buildings, in this case, however, provide that he could equip the incineration plant with the best filters available. Part of the plant accessible to visitors demonstrates the problems associated with excessive production of waste. 

Public toilets Kawakawa

Public toilets Kawakawa at Hundertwasser´s beloved New Zealand. The interior is designed to contain as few straight lines and right angles as possible. 

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Architecture

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